Tamarind City

I know what you are thinking… It has taken me far too long to read this book. A book which is about my favorite place on earth – Chennai. A book written by someone associated with my favorite publication – The Hindu.

I want to say Ghosh nailed it. But I can’t… He gets close though. The book starts off slow and Ghosh ambles on about his love for Chennai and we wait for the book to focus…. On chennai. It does and he ensures that he travels the breadth and length of the city. From St Thomas mount to Sriperambathur, from Mylapore to Marina, from Triplicane to T M Krishna, from Appa Gardens to Amma, from George Town to Gymkhana club. Sometimes we feel that he has rearranged the archives from S Muthiah’s archives. But most of the time he sticks true to his quest.

Ghosh misses two very important facets of Chennai – koyambedu and kollywood. The koyambedu market is definitely a landmark that should feature in a travel book and kollywood is the arm candy of chennai. How did he miss that? Editorial arm wriggling?

But Tamarind city brings alive the streets of Chennai – the cacophony, chaos and the civility. We are painfully modest, traditional yet tech savvy, loyal yet accommodating… Chennai is truly where modern India began.

I read this book on a train ride from munich to vienna and instead of dreaming about the sights in the Austrian capital, Ghosh made me wistful of my filter Kappi. That my friend is a good book.

Is Queen the feminist we have forgotten?

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Losing hand
In a drunken reverie Rani(Ranaut) professes how her life mirrors Gupta uncle. That uncle who never let the stench of tobacco near nor laced his lips with alcohol yet somehow succumbed to the misery of cancer. This is her. She has obeyed every rule in the book; never defied her parents; was subservient to her fiance and played a pushover to the world yet life dealt her a losing hand; Love lynched her and destiny ditched her.  Why her? And more importantly what now?

Runaway but not revolting
Rani after being dumped at the altar decides to honeymoon alone. Why does she do it? Earlier on we see how she saves every penny towards her honeymoon fund (which is visiting her most favorite cities Paris and Amsterdam). So when she is robbed of the romance why give up this treasured dream? She quietly confides to her dad that she wants to go but will not if he chooses otherwise. She does not defy yet calmly expresses her decision. For a girl who has hardly stepped out of Rajori she decides to globe-trot, alone. Only she isn’t fully prepared.

Pushing boundaries
In Paris, she hardly leaves her room. Her grandmother chides her “if you just wanted to watch the Telly, why go all the way to a different country” – a nudge here. Her epic encounter with vijaya lakshmi(vijay) shoves her further in exploring the city. She is still terrified of the Eiffel which as lovers they had declared to visit together. But she decides to hang around. She gets drunk, dances in public and almost gets arrested, all of which her fiance and his mummy would have resented. But she is having a ball by flying solo.

In Amsterdam she has yet another territory to invade. Her roommates are all men and she cannot coexist with the (unrelated)opposite sex in the same room. It’s not whether she trusts them but it’s rather that she is not(yet) strong enough to take this step. Eventually she conquers this too. She learns to befriend them, converses freely about her life and yet sticks to her boundaries.

Finally when the fiance comes begging to take him back, she doesn’t give him a speech about how she has changed etc. She reminds him pleasantly that she has other plans and they should meet in Rajori. She is buying time but remembers to pay for herself. I can take care of myself and no I don’t need a knight in a shining armor to stand beside me.  Also she wears a new outfit that she brought for herself in Paris not to swoon him but to state that she knows she is beautiful inside out.

Feminist yet fragile
Rani is elegant, gullible and sheer poetry. Her search to find her strength within the confines of her identity is the cynosure of this well crafted film. We see Rani lip locking with a foreigner but it is brief and does not lead to this-will-never-work-out sob story. Rani is a feminist in the sense that she learns to stand out, speak her mind and yet learns to be respectful. (Even when she meets her ex fiancé’s mother she pays her respects.)

Queen reinforces my belief that feminism is not only about wardrobe choices, physical and sexual freedom but about more significant aspects like attitude and identity. In the end, Rani hugs Vijay and thanks him for giving her a chance to go on this journey but I thank Rani for coming back with her core spirit intact because that is something nobody can deny or steal from you.

Chopped Wings

The H4 visa is a curse, an immigration deadlock that stops smart, successful women from having a fair shot at a great career. The Department of Homeland Security is ambling with solutions but the H4 crisis is wrecking lives especially with the Indian immigrant populace.

Here is the story in detail. Are you suffering from this immigration bottleneck? Do you need out of this situation?
Chopped wings – wasted potential

East Vs West: Water Sense

Leonardo Di Caprio rarely takes a shower to conserve water and raise awareness on the water crisis. While many (especially his girlfriend) may argue that this is taking things too far, the water crisis is real and impending.

An average urban Indian consumes 15 gallons of water for his shower and an American uses 176 gallons per day. Do you know how much water an African requires for his daily ablutions? Guess?

Everywhere water sources are routinely diminishing and in some cases have vanished completely. Water may not be available forever if we don’t start conserving it today. Our children will live in a world of thirst because we did nothing to save water.

Want to learn more on how to save water? Read my article here. Act now and it will make a huge impact.

Star Power

Tamil cinema fans are often seen as rowdy and raucous bursting crackers, pouring milk, erecting effigies and in general doing nothing worthwhile. But when a star uses his clout to direct this huge mob towards social service the results could be monumental.

http://www.behindwoods.com/tamil-movies-cinema-column/superstar-ilayathalapathy-suriya-big-b-and-king-khan.html

East vs West – The paper trail

The Alternative is an initiative that focuses on sustainable living and for a while I’ve been contributing to their site. But on my recent visit to India, I observed that many practices and everyday living that my parents followed rarely affected the environment. Infact it nurtured and protected it. In contradiction, the western lives that we led in the USA was causing a severe strain to the major players. Yet we were the ones making all the noise and hoopla about going green and protecting the environment. So who was really making a bigger mess and hence had to do a better clean up? This series East vs West is an extension of my introspection of the Indian and immigrant lifestyles.

The first post focuses on paper. Contrasting consumption, production and recycling techniques The Paper Trail urges us to recycle more. Would be very happy to hear your thoughts.